At the end of our date we agreed that even if the hookup thing didn’t work out (which it didn’t

At the end of our date we agreed that even if the hookup thing didn’t work out (which it didn’t

Because Feeld encourages you to be so clear about your desires, communication and hard boundaries are not just a good sign but essential. It’s simply the culture of the app. Of course, Feeld isn’t flawless, and I wouldn’t want to meet up with most of the users I come across (there are weirdos in every corner of the internet, including sex-positive ones; not to mention australian chat room, the app itself isn’t perfect, either… it can get really buggy). But each person I did get together with IRL-from unicorns to “regular” straight cis dudes-delivered precisely what they transparently promised. In one particular case, Feeld delivered much more.

Amanda K. and I initially matched because I was looking for a unicorn, and she was looking to be one. We met up for a glass of wine, just the two of us, while the guy I was dating was out of town (going on three-way dates in public to see if the vibe is right for a threesome is a whole other story). We talked about the play she was staging, the book I’d just written, and our cross-country travels, in addition to my teacher-student fantasy, her newfound affinity for dd/lg (Daddy Dom/Little Girl role play, remember?), and what we were looking for in a threesome. .. the guy and I broke up), we should absolutely still be friends. Fast-forward a year, and I now consider this person-still labeled “Amanda Feeld Qt” in my phone-one of my dearest confidantes.

I reached out to some higher-ups at Feeld asking whether or not it’s unusual to meet sex-free friends on their app

From the first five minutes Amanda K. and I met, I found it incredibly refreshing to chat casually-without judgment-about my unique sex life with another young female experiencing something similar. After all, as inclusive as our culture is slowly becoming, it’s still not exactly “normal” or even safe to be an openly sex-positive woman in your 20s. Amanda K. agrees: “With so many of my other friendships, I’ve had to test the waters first to see if we could talk about sex,” she told me over Thai food a few weeks ago. “I literally did that last night with girls I’ve known for years, girls I have traveled with, and we still couldn’t talk about vibrators without two glasses of wine.” Having a friend with whom you can speak out loud about things like threesomes and role-play “normalizes something that we’ve been te about,” she said. “It’s empowering just to be able to have those sorts of conversations.” Unexpectedly, for both of us, Feeld made these exchanges possible for the first time. Even after Amanda K. and I both found loving monogamous partners-I found mine in real life; she found hers on Feeld!-we continue to play this special role in each other’s lives.

We had so much in common: both short, freckly, professional writers named Amanda Marie, who loved Europe, theater, and dominant sexual partners-the similarities were uncanny

“Feeld can be anything a person would like it to be-from a place for platonic connections to an exploration ground for fulfilling long-held fantasies,” responded Lyubov Sachkova, Feeld’s communications lead. “The way we see it as contributing to sex positivity isn’t necessarily by enabling sexual encounters but by normalizing sexuality in all its multiplicity.” (I will say it’s probably wise to mention in your profile that you’re open to platonic friends, though in my case I didn’t know I was until I met one!) Sachkova says the folks at Feeld believe “transparency, openness, and trust are at the core of sex-positive experiences,” and their platform was built on those principles.